Conditional Sentence Examples – Classification & Exercises

A conditional sentence is a complex sentence that has a principal clause and a subordinate clause, and the subordinate clause begins with If. Conditional sentence examples are-

Conditional Sentence Examples

  • If you want to recover your health, you need to take exercise regularly.
  • If you followed my advice, you could improve your health.
  • I would have taken exercise regularly If I had been in your position,
  • I shall go, If he comes,
  • Start right now, If you want to catch the train.
  • Work hard, If you shine in your life.

Classification of Conditional sentence

There are five types of conditional sentences in English Grammar. The proper classification of Conditional sentences is given in the following table-

Classification of Conditional sentence Usages Field Principal clause Subordinate clause
 Zero Conditional Sentence Narrating  common Matter Simple present tense Simple present tense
First Conditional A feasible scenario and the result Will + infinitive Simple present
Second conditional A hypothetical circumstance and its viable result Would + infinitive Simple past
Third Conditional An now no longer viable past state of affairs and its result in the past Would + perfect infinitive Past perfect
Mixed Conditionals An now no longer feasible past situation and its result in the present Past perfect Present conditional

Zero Conditional with examples

Zero conditional is used to make statements approximately the actual world, and frequently refers to popular truths, which include clinical facts. In those sentences, the time is now or usually and the state of affairs is actual and possible. Zero Conditional sentence examples are-

  • If I heat ice, it melts.
  • Ice melts if  I heat it.
  • When we heat ice, it melts.
  • If it rains, Trees get wet.
  • If we freeze water, it becomes ice.

First Conditional Sentence

Structure: If +Present+Future ( Imperative)

Examples – If you want I shall help you.

If-clause means to impose conditions. Which may or may not be met. The structure has two clauses. One is the principal clause and the other is the subordinate clause. The ‘if’ added clause is a subordinate clause and it is present indefinite tense or Imperative sentences. ‘If’ clause is used before or after the principal clause. If this clause is placed before the principal clause then it is followed by a com

  • You will catch a cold if you play in the rain.
  • If he comes, I shall go
  • You will catch a cold if you play in the rain.
  • The Plane will take off if there is no fog.
  • Do the work if you demand money.

Possible variations of First conditional sentences

  • If + Present +May/Might ( Possibility) – If the fog gets thicker, the train may/might delay.
  • If+ Present + May/Can (permission/Ability)- If It Stops raining, we may go out.
  • First Conditional+must, should, or any expression of command, request & advice

Examples- You had better eat less if you want to maintain good health,                                                                                             If you see him tomorrow, would/ could you ask him to phone me?

  • If+ present continuous, to indicate a present action or a future arrangement,

Examples- You had better join the queue if you are waiting for a bus ( Present action)                                                                    If you are looking for Mr. Jack (Present action), you will find him in the staff room.

  • If+ Present Perfect- If you have written the letter I shall post it.

Second conditional examples

Such conditional clauses refer to future events and the conditions imposed on them are not impossible to be fulfilled but are very unlikely to be fulfilled.

This conditional clause has a past indefinite tense and the principal clause uses the present form of the past conditional + should / would / might + verb.

Structure: IF+ Past indefinite +Principal clause or, Principal clause +If+Past indefinite. Second conditional sentence examples-

  • If he came I would go.
  • If he got money, he would buy a mobile set for me.

However, the ‘If clause’ can be used as a ‘were’-verb after the subject.

  • If I were you, I would not do the work.
  • I would fly If I were a bird.

Third Conditional  sentence

The conditions imposed on such a clause cannot be fulfilled because the work of this clause does not take place in reality.

In this case, the conditional clause is past perfect conditional (subject + should have / would have / might have + past participle of verb).  Third conditional sentence examples-

  • If I had seen Him, I would have told him the matter.
  • They might have done the work if we had given money to them.
  • The teacher would have punished him if he had been absent from the class.

Often in such conditional subordinate conjunction ‘had’ is used at the beginning of a sentence instead of ‘If’.

  • Had I seen him, I would have told him the matter.

Mixed conditional  sentence

These conditional sentences discuss an unreal gift scenario and its probable (however unreal) beyond the result. In those conditional sentences, the time withinside the if-clause is now or usually, and the time withinside the predominant clause is earlier than now.

  • ‘if you will / if you would’ is used to mean polite request. However, if you would structure the more used as a polite form. Examples- If you will/would help me, I shall be grateful to you.
  • This clause starts with the present form of ‘if you could + verb’ when the speaker assumes that the listener will protect his condition/request. However, in this case, the principal clause is implied.                                                           Examples- If you would open your books (in the class).                                                                                           If you would fill up the form (in the office).
  • Instead of ‘if + want/wish’, the conditional clause can be formed using would like/care.                                                           Example- If you want to come, I will wait for you.                                                                                                 If you would like to come, I will wait for you.
  • If there is no object after ‘Would Like’, ‘would’ can be omitted. But if there is an object after ‘would like’, would not be omitted. Examples-                                                                                                   If you come, I shall wait for you.                                                                                                            If you would like to buy a ticket, I shall manage one for you.

Conditional Sentence Exercises

  1. I will be happy if…………………………..
  2. I will tell him the matter ………………………….
  3. If I saw him…………………………………………………………
  4. I  would have come if, …………………………………
  5. If she had written the letter………………………………………….
  6. Had I been huge money……………………………………………….
  7. The accident could have been avoided …………………………
  8. If I were you…………………………………………………………………..
  9. I would not take the job if………………………………………..
  10. The Police would have arrested him…………………………………..

Answer

  1. You visit me.
  2. If I go there.
  3. I would help him.
  4. You had invited me.
  5. I would have posted it.
  6. I would have helped the poor.
  7. If the Driver had followed the traffic rules.
  8. I would not do the job.
  9. If I had not lost the previous one.
  10. If he had done the crime.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Comment